The 16 DnB Rudiments

The first group develops the ever-present offbeat unaccented 16th note, an important part DnB drumming. Group 2 rudiments were designed by taking a stream of four 16th notes, and substituting one of the 16th notes (the first, second, third or fourth one) with a rest.

These rudiments don’t really fit into the traditional class of the standard PAS 26 rudiments. DnB rudiments:

  1. Do not contain double strokes.
  2. Use the snare, bass drum, and hi hat/ride.

I highly recommend that any drummer practice the standard PAS 26 – play them slowly and in control, and pay particular attention to the difference in volume between accented and unaccented notes. These DnB rudiments, however, do not try to build just technique. They are the building blocks to vertical DnB playing, as described earlier (go back and read “What is Drum n’ Bass Drumming?” if you haven’t done so yet). Mastering these rudiments, and overcoming the awkwardness of newfound interdependence between the limbs, will have you playing DnB beats in no time.

Rudiment Group 1

This rudiment group develops the ever-present offbeat unaccented 16th note, an important part DnB drumming. There are four of these. Each rudiment includes four sixteenth notes, a quarter note’s worth of time. The rudiments are numbered above the staff.

7a.

Since the DnB rudiments should really be memorized and internalized, there are no specific exercises written out. The best way to practice them is to lay the page out in front of your drumset, turn on the metronome to a slow tempo, and play different combinations of the rudiments in various orders. Come up with different patterns. Below are some examples for Group 1 rudiments. The tempos for this rudiments section (tracks 28 through 39) are 120 BPM for slow, 160 BPM for fast.

7b.

SLOW
FAST

7c.

SLOW
FAST

7d.

SLOW
FAST

Make sure that the unaccented snare hits are quiet and fluid. Once you can play any combination of the rudiments smoothly, speed up the tempo. Slowly work your way up to 160 BPM. The idea here is control and stamina, not speed. Concentrate on achieving a smooth flow of rock-solid 16th notes.

Rudiment Group 2

Group 2 rudiments were designed by taking a stream of four 16th notes, and substituting one of the 16th notes (the first, second, third or fourth one) with a rest. Rudiments in 8a have a rest substituted for the first 16th note, rudiments in 8b have a rest substituted for the second 16th note, rudiments in 8c have a rest substituted for the third 16th note, and rudiments in 8d have a rest substituted for the fourth 16th note. So, each subset, 8a-8d, has its own signature surface rhythm. This concept is then combined with the limitation that bass drum, accented snare drum, and ride hits usually do not occur on the 2nd or fourth 16th note.

In this rudiment group, it is important for the drummer to “think like a machine”. Each note on the page must be given its full value and must be placed exactly where it is supposed to be. To do this, again, it is imperative that you BEGIN SLOWLY AND USE A METRONOME.

8a.

8b.

8c.

8d.

Again, when you first begin practising these, make sure that your flow isn’t interrupted. Play them SLOWLY AND WITH A METRONOME. Play Group 2 rudiments like the Group 1 rudiments – in different patterns and combinations, but consistently. Below are some examples.

8e.

SLOW
FAST

8f.

SLOW
FAST

8g.

SLOW
FAST

Author: Anthony Allen

I was the guy behind Drumsallday. THANK YOU for visiting the site.